Rockets land in Iraq’s Camp Taji, home to US military personnel

The Iraqi military says three rockets have hit an installation north of Baghdad used by Iraqi troops and where American trainers are also present. There was no immediate word on casualties.

The late Monday attack on Camp Taji, about 27 kilometers (17 miles) north of Baghdad, is the second on a military post housing U.S. personnel. An attack on an air base, also housing U.S. trainers, north of Baghdad on Saturday caused a small fire.

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US releases photos to bolster claim Iran attacked tankers as 1,000 additional troops to be sent to Middle East

In an effort to bolster its public case against Iran, the Pentagon on Monday released new photos that officials said show that members of Tehran’s Revolutionary Guard were responsible for attacks last week on two oil tankers near the Persian Gulf.

The images, many taken from a Navy helicopter, show what the Pentagon said were Iranian forces removing an unexploded mine from the side of the Japanese-owned Kokuka Courageous oil tanker in the Gulf of Oman.

Officials last week said the move appeared to be an attempt to remove forensic evidence from the scene of the attack. But it’s not clear if examination of the mine would have made it definitively clear that the device was planted by the IRGC.

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Trial Set to Begin for Navy SEAL in Islamic State Prisoner’s Killing

The trial of a decorated Navy SEAL charged with killing an Islamic State prisoner in his care is set to begin Monday following months of turmoil in one of the Navy’s most prominent war crimes cases.

The court-martial of Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher, which begins with jury selection, has included the removal of the lead prosecutor for tracking the defense team’s emails and suggestions by President Donald Trump that he may pardon the defendant.

Gallagher has pleaded not guilty to premeditated murder in the killing of the prisoner in his care and attempted murder in the shootings of two civilians in Iraq in 2017 in separate incidents. Gallagher says disgruntled platoon mates fabricated the allegations because they didn’t like his tough leadership.

His lawyers asked the Navy judge to dismiss the case because they say investigators and prosecutors withheld evidence that could help the defense and violated his rights to a fair trial by embedding tracking software in emails sent to them.

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Bill Clinton speaks at funeral for CDT Christopher Morgan

The West Point cadet killed in a horrific training accident was laid to rest over the weekend in a service attended by more than a thousand mourners, including former President Clinton.

Slain cadet Christopher Morgan’s dad was once a member of Clinton’s security detail.

The funeral service was held Saturday at the US Military Academy for Morgan, who was killed earlier this month when the armored personnel transport he and 21 others were riding in flipped and fell several feet down a steep embankment.

Morgan, a 22-year-old West Orange, NJ, native, was “an exemplary classmate and teammate” who was “tremendously proud to be a cadet,” said Maj. Gen. Steve Gilland, West Point’s Commandant of Cadets.

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Man arrested in ’87 cold case slaying of Fort Carson soldier

A suburban Denver man has been arrested in the unsolved slaying of a soldier in Colorado 32 years ago after DNA evidence was used to create an image of what a suspect might look like, authorities said Friday.

Civilian and Army investigators arrested Michael Whyte of Thornton in the 1987 strangulation death of Darlene Krashoc, 20, a soldier stationed at Fort Carson outside Colorado Springs.

Whyte, 58, was arrested at his home Thursday on suspicion of first-degree murder. Online jail records did not indicate whether he had an attorney who could speak on his behalf.

Krashoc’s body was found behind a Colorado Springs restaurant on March 17, 1987. Investigators said she had gone to a nightclub the previous evening with other soldiers from her unit, a maintenance company.

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Court allows a class-action lawsuit against VA for the first time

A federal court for the first time will allow a class-action lawsuit against the Department of Veterans Affairs to move ahead, a move that legal experts said opens the doors for a host of similar cases against the bureaucracy.

The decision, which could affect thousands of veterans, came late last week in the U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims. Last August, the same court for the first time ruled that class-action lawsuits would be allowed against VA in “appropriate cases,” but no such claims met court standards until now.

This case — Godsey v. Wilkie — sought relief for veterans facing waits of more than two months for the department to certify their disability benefits appeals claims. The case was originally filed in 2017 on behalf of four veterans facing lengthy delays, but lawyers argued it should be broadened to include an entire class of individuals waiting for their benefits.

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D-Day 75th Anniversary: Trump, Macron And Other Leaders Mark A Historic Day

“They won back this ground for civilization,” President Trump said of the Allied troops who took part in the massive D-Day invasion 75 years ago today. Trump stood on a stage near Omaha Beach in northern France, alongside French President Emmanuel Macron and other world leaders who thanked U.S. veterans and their allies for preserving liberty.

The commemoration in Normandy, France, marks the 75th anniversary of the massive amphibious invasion, in which more than 150,000 U.S., British and Canadian troops forced their way onto France’s shores to bring the fight to Adolf Hitler. They were supported by nearly 7,000 naval vessels and more than 11,000 aircraft in one of the most important operations of World War II

More than 160 World War II veterans sat in rows on a red-carpeted stage during the ceremony at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in Colleville-sur-Mer, France. They included dozens of men who landed on the beaches of Normandy on June 6, 1944.

“You are the pride of our nation, you are the glory of the republic, and we thank you from the bottom of our hearts,” Trump told the veterans.

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Judge allows racist FB page as evidence in fatal stabbing of newly commissioned 2nd lieutenant

UPPER MARLBORO, Md. — Racist memes on a cellphone and a racist Facebook page can be used as evidence in the trial of a white man charged with murder and a hate crime in a black student’s fatal stabbing on the University of Maryland’s campus, a judge ruled Wednesday.

Sean Urbanski’s attorneys argued it would deprive their client of a fair trial if jurors were to see evidence that the 24-year-old liked a Facebook page called “Alt-Reich: Nation” and had at least six photographs of racist memes on his phone.

Prince George’s County prosecutors said the racist content found on Urbanski’s cellphone point to a motive for the killing, indicating he stabbed Bowie State University student Richard Collins III because he was black.

“These photographs show that the defendant has a bias against black people,” said deputy state’s attorney Jason Abbott. “These photos show violence against black people.”

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The last Akwesasne Mohawk code talker from World War II has died

ST. REGIS INDIAN RESERVATION, N.Y. — The last of the remaining Mohawk “code talkers” who were belatedly honored for their World War II service has died at age of 94.

The WWNY-TV reports that Louis Levi Oakes’s funeral was held Saturday on the Mohawk reservation, which straddles the U.S.-Canadian border.

The Press-Republican of Plattsburgh report s that Oakes was one of 17 Akwesasne (og-wuh-SAHZ’-nee) Mohawks to receive the Congressional Silver Medal for his military contributions as a Native American code talker in 2016. Code talkers used their various native languages for military communications.

The newspaper said the Silver Star recipient served in the Army for six years and saw action in the South Pacific, New Guinea and Philippines theaters.

Oakes kept his role as a code talker secret for decades, even to relatives.

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These three military bases may soon house unaccompanied immigrant children

Three military installations are being considered to temporarily shelter unaccompanied immigrant children who have been apprehended at the border, officials said.

Malmstrom Air Force Base, Montana, and Fort Sill, Oklahoma, may be the closest of the three to receiving the children. They have already received initial assessments from the Department of Health and Human Services, but there are steps remaining in the approval process, said Defense Department spokesman Army Maj. Chris Mitchell. Fort Benning, Georgia, is also being considered, and HHS officials were reportedly scheduled to tour vacant property at Fort Benning today to determine its suitability for potential future use to house the children.

The bases are being considered because shelters at the border are beyond capacity to hold the children, ages 17 and under, while HHS officials work to find sponsors for them, usually family members. HHS has asked for an emergency appropriation of nearly $3 billion to increase shelter capacity.

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