Improving Army readiness for the 21st century
When Lt. Gen. Robert T. Dail retired seven years ago, he was one of the most senior military logisticians in the Department of Defense. In his last assignment, he served as the director of the Defense Logistics Agency, where his team provided 95 percent of the materiel used in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. An interview was conducted to get his perspective on today's Army readiness and the evolving relationships among the Army, its sister services, and industry.

GIVEN THE UNCERTAINTY IN THE WORLD, WHAT CAN LOGISTICS LEADERS DO TO ENSURE THEIR FORMATIONS ARE READY?

At the tactical level, the job of logistics leaders is to train every day and develop junior leaders in a way that prepares their units to be called upon at any time to deploy in defense of the nation. Logistics leaders should work to keep their units as ready as possible through realistic training. That's the most important aspect of the tactical leader's job. 

At the operational level and, to a greater extent, the strategic level, where commands are filled with a combination of military members, career civilians, and contractors, logistics leaders have to be flexible and resilient--ready to change. They have to be ready to deploy their experts to integrate with tactical and regional commands so that responsive support is provided to the troops. 
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