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Defense Grant for Traumatic Brain Injury Pain Study
Lpath, Inc. (NASDAQ: LPTN), the industry leader in bioactive lipid-targeted therapeutics, has been awarded a $1.45 million two-year grant by the Defense Medical Research and Development Program (DMRDP), an agency of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). This grant will support the study of Lpathomab for the treatment of neuropathic pain associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Lpath is working with Professor David Yeomans, Ph.D. of Stanford University's Department of Anesthesia on this project and he will serve as co-principal investigator.

This DoD grant will fund preclinical studies designed to evaluate the ability of Lpathomab to alleviate pain following neurotrauma, and to confirm the potential efficacy of Lpathomab as previously demonstrated by Stanford University researchers in an animal model of TBI pain.

Roger Sabbadini, Ph.D., Lpath's founder and co-principal investigator on the TBI project, commented, "Lpath is grateful to the DoD for recognizing the significant value of funding further development of Lpathomab. We believe our novel approach of targeting bioactive lipids holds great promise, and this is validated by the financial commitment from the DoD's DMRDP."

Lpath has recently completed a Phase 1a double-blind, placebo-controlled, single ascending dose study to evaluate the safety and tolerability of Lpathomab in healthy volunteers. Lpathomab was tolerated at all doses tested, and no serious adverse events or dose limiting toxicities were observed.

Dario Paggiarino, M.D., Lpath's senior vice president and chief development officer commented, "Now that Lpath has successfully demonstrated safety and tolerability of Lpathomab in healthy volunteers, we anticipate testing Lpathomab in patients with neuropathic pain. The preclinical demonstration of Lpathomab's potential efficacy in TBI pain could support another important indication for further investigation."
 
Soldier’s skydiving injuries eased through adaptive sports
While attending Airborne School, U.S. Army Capt. Justin Decker knew instantly that something felt different during his third of five jumps required to earn the coveted airborne “Jump” wings. At first he adopted the ‘ignore it and it’ll go away strategy,’ until the pain eventually became too great. It wasn’t until sometime later that an MRI revealed one of his vertebrae had slipped out of position. “I simply did not think it was as bad as it turned out to be,” said Decker.

Immediately after surgery Decker stated that he felt better, but soon thereafter the pain returned. It turned out that the vertebrae itself was continuing to grow and was pressing into a nerve. A second surgery ensued, attempting to arrest the bone growth. It was unsuccessful. Today, Decker and his doctors are foregoing, for as long as possible, the undertaking of yet another surgery. 

Having twice been assigned to Fort Hood, Texas, Warrior Transition Unit, Decker has witnessed tremendous growth in WTU adaptive sports opportunities. During his first WTU assignment, in 2008, he was forced to go out on his own in acquiring a recumbent bicycle. By the time of his second assignment to the WTU, a full-fledged cycling group had been established. “So I joined up with the group, pulled my bike out of storage and got back on it after a five-year hiatus,” Decker said. “On that very first day it all came back to me. That’s really what spring-boarded me into adaptive reconditioning.” 

After advancing through Army Trials Decker, is competing in his first Warrior Games, being held at the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, June 15-21.

Decker says that he had always been an avid cyclist but, at the WTU, he was also introduced to wheelchair racing, though, after having tried it for the first time he swore he’d never do so again. “I only went around the track twice and every part of my body hurt, especially my arms,” said Decker. “I didn’t know what I was doing at all.”
 
Carter Describes Security Networks’ Role in Confronting Threats

Defense Secretary Ash Carter discussed the importance of establishing and maintaining security networks with partner nations to confront global threats during a speech to the Center for a New American Security here today.

Carter focused on the security networks the United States has forged in the Asia-Pacific region, the Middle East and in Europe.

Overall, such networks enable nations to act together to deter conflict, provide protection and meet transnational threats such as terrorism, the secretary said. “Now, security networking does differ across regions,” he added, “and that makes sense, because each has its own unique history, geography, politics and security needs.”

Networking for Security

The Asia-Pacific networks are based on weaving together bilateral, trilateral and multilateral relationships into a larger, regionwide network, Carter said, noting that there has never been a regionwide security arrangement there in the past.

“In the Middle East and North Africa, we’re leading coalitions and networks to address key security challenges like [the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant] and other terror groups, and to counter Iran’s malign influence,” the secretary said.

In Europe, the United States is working within the NATO alliance to bolster deterrence, handle unregulated migration and confront threats in new domains.

“In each region, the basic principle is the same,” Carter said. “We’re bringing together like-minded partners to enhance cooperation and build and strengthen connections,” he said. “And in each region, the network needs a networker -- a nation and a military to enable it.”

Connections:

Connections take many forms, the secretary said. “For one, we’re sharing information, including intelligence, in new ways, to allow our militaries to communicate better and in real time so that we can work together seamlessly and quickly,” he told the audience. “More and more, we’re leveraging persistent rotational forces that allow us to project presence without the requirements of permanent footprints.”

Read more... 


 
Reserve Soldiers Combine Civilian, Army Skills
The U.S. Army Reserve transportation management coordinators, of the 385th Transportation Detachment, Fort Bragg, North Carolina traveled across the country to participate in Combat Support Training Exercise 91-16-02 at Fort Hunter Liggett, California. These Soldiers walk, talk, and perform at the same level as their active duty counterparts, with one exception: They also have full-time civilian careers.

As the largest U.S. Army Reserve training exercise, CSTX 91-16-02 provides Soldiers with unique opportunities to sharpen their technical and tactical skills in combat-like conditions. Soldiers from the 385th put their civilian lives on hold for this three-week exercise to report for military duty and provide transportation movement control to units at Tactical Assembly Area Schoonover.

“The Soldiers stop the vehicles, ask for trip tickets and log the time,” said Staff Sgt. Araina McCormick, from Fayetteville, N.C.

A seemingly simple task, this job keeps track of the times Soldiers depart and return from missions. Whether in a training scenario or a combat zone, this is a critical point in the movement control process, providing information about which personnel or vehicles may be missing, and for how long.

The duty these Soldiers perform is essential for the safety and success of CSTX, and positively affects each Soldier's personal and professional development when they bring what the U.S. Army Reserve has taught them back into their civilian lives.

For Spc. Jahvar Billings, from Pembroke, North Carolina, that means utilizing the discipline and time management skills the Army has given him into his life as a full-time student.
 
Warrior Games final: Top team goes to black & gold
Heat, humidity and wicked thunderstorms forced organizers of the 2015 Warrior Games to juggle schedules and work overtime to ensure the safety of all athletes, but little could dampen the spirit of sports as 270 athletes competed for 527 medals in Quantico, Virginia, June 19-28.

The Army team smoked the competition, earning the grand prize of the games, the Chairman's Cup, by bringing home 162 medals, including 69 golds. Taking second place for the second year in a row, the Marine Corps team earned 105 medals, including 47 golds.
 
 Air Force came in third in the medal count with 87, followed at their heels by the British team, with 85. Special Operations Command athletes earned 45 medals, while the combined Navy and Coast Guard team took home 43.

With his service hosting this year's games, Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Joe Dunford praised the athletes for their indomitable spirit — for adapting and for overcoming the challenges they have faced during illness, injury and recovery.
 
DoD Hack the Pentagon' Program Nets 138 Issues
Hack the planet? Tough. Hack the Pentagon? Easier, but still fairly tough. Yet, that didn't stop more than 250 hackers from taking part in the Department of Defense's first-ever bug bounty program. The pilot, which ran from April 18 to May 12—less than a month—netted 138 vulnerabilities that the Defense Department determined to be "legitimate, unique and eligible for a bounty."

Though the bug bounty program ended up costing the federal government around $150,000, officials believe it was money well spent.

"It's not a small sum, but if we had gone through the normal process of hiring an outside firm to do a security audit and vulnerability assessment, which is what we usually do, it would have cost us more than $1 million," said Ash Carter, Secretary of Defense, as reported by the DoD.

The Department of Defense seems pleased by the results, as it also announced that it's now planning to expand its bug bounty program and introduce other policies designed to help bolster DoD security. That includes the creation of a new vulnerability disclosure policy that will allow anyone to submit information about potential vulnerabilities in DoD systems, networks, applications, or websites.

"Next we will expand bug bounty programs to other DoD Components, in particular the Services, by developing a sustainable DoD-wide contract vehicle. Lastly, we'll include incentives in our acquisition policies and guidance so that contractors practice greater transparency and open their own systems for testing – especially DoD source code. With these efforts, we will capitalize on Hack the Pentagon's success and continue to evolve the way we secure DoD networks, systems, and information," reads an announcement from the Department of Defense.
 
Thousands honor Fort Hood fallen Soldiers
housands in this sprawling Central Texas post paused for a solemn memorial held for nine fallen warriors June 16 during a service inside the Spirit of Fort Hood Chapel.

Eight Soldiers from 3rd Battalion, 16th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, and one cadet from the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, were the victims of flash flood waters while conducting convoy operations June 2 on Fort Hood.

"Today, we honor and pay tribute to nine fallen comrades of the 1st Cav. Div.," said Maj. Gen. John 'J.T.' Thomson III, 1st Cav. Div. commanding general. "These exceptional cavalry troopers from Fox Forward Support Company … represent the best our nation has to offer."

Thomson added that as the community mourns the lives lost, "We also praise them for who they were, what they stood for and how they honorably served our nation.

"They were many things to many people -- sons and daughters, brothers and sisters, fathers and husbands, caring friends, trustworthy classmates and loyal comrades-in-arms," he said.

Central Texas and the Army family across the nation came together in the wake of the flood to support those in mourning and remember the lives of each victim. The venue for the service has a capacity of 1,500, which was not large enough to seat all those hoping to attend. To reach out to hundreds more, the ceremony was live-streamed to Howze Theater, the Phantom Warrior Center and several conference rooms within the chapel itself.
 
Artwork Honors Military Women
“Honor knows no gender,” artist Steve Alpert said at the Women in Military Service for America Memorial in Arlington, Virginia, June 13.

Alpert spoke following the unveiling of a triptych titled “Portrait of a Woman.” His work depicts a female soldier seen from three directions -- both profiles and from the back. She is saluting the U.S. flag.
 
A triptych is a set of three associated artistic, literary, or musical works intended to be appreciated together.

The subject of Alpert’s work is a warrior wearing the combat patch of the storied 101st Airborne Division on her sleeve. “She looks fierce,” said one of the women veterans who attended the unveiling.

That was the idea, Alpert said during an interview.

“Courage is what an ordinary person does in an extraordinary situation,” he said. “’Portrait of a Woman’ honors the girls next door who went and signed up, volunteered for the armed services. They took the oath to protect the Constitution, the Bill of Rights and the pursuit of the American Dream. I define that as courage, and I see them as heroes.”
 
2 BCT commander heads to the Pentagon
For most of the past two years, Col. Joseph Ryan was on standby, waiting for the Army to send him and his 4,200 troops from the 2nd Brigade Combat Team across the globe to respond to crises or pitch in aid after a natural disaster.

As the unit on status as the Global Response Force, he knew he would have to recall and deploy his paratroopers in as little as 18 hours.

"The experience of being on the Global Response Force, it revalidates the notion that the paratrooper and 82nd Airborne Division can do anything," he said. "We give them training that challenges them and pushes them to prepare for deployment. We work very hard, train very hard, challenge ourselves on a daily basis."
 
Ryan will leave the 2nd Brigade Combat Team as he heads to Washington, D.C., to serve as the executive officer to the Army's chief of staff at the Pentagon. He'll be working directly with Gen. Mark Milley, the former commander of Forces Command who is currently the Army's chief of staff.

"It's a great opportunity," Ryan said. "It's a challenge, and I'm looking forward to it."

Ryan's path to the Pentagon began when he was accepted into the United States Military Academy. He grew up near West Point and knew he wanted to pursue a military career.

"My family had a lot of pride," he said. "Being in the Army and leading people was something I really enjoy."

Ryan graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1991 and was commissioned as a second lieutenant of infantry.
 
Speaking Frankly, at West Point
Drew Faust gave one of the signal speeches of her Harvard presidency at West Point this past March. The subject was education in the humanities—and in leadership. Her talk brought to the fore common Faust themes: immersion in the arts and humanities and learning to think critically about values. The venue and format (a formal address, rather than the occasions where an interlocutor poses questions, and Faust’s answers are briefer) made a difference.

At the United States Military Academy (USMA), as Faust noted, “the humanities are resources that build ‘self-awareness, character, [and] perspective,’ and enable leaders to compel and to connect with others.” She identified three ways in which that occurs. “First,” she said, “leaders need perspective”—the historical and cultural lenses that clarify a situation through “empathy: how to see ourselves inside another person’s experience. How to picture a different possibility.” Second, “leaders need the capacity to improvise. I often point out that education is not the same thing as training for a job.…Circumstances evolve. Certainly, soldiers know…that our knowledge needs to be flexible, as we grapple with complexity in an instant.” Third, she emphasized how leaders like Churchill and Lincoln “use the persuasive power of language.”

Two broad applications to Harvard come to mind. One concerns transitions. West Point, Faust noted, was “the nation’s first college of engineering.” Now, even as “other institutions drop liberal-arts requirements, military academies have been adding them. Over the past 50 years, West Point has transformed its curriculum into a general liberal-arts education, graduating leaders with broad-based knowledge of both the sciences and the humanities, and the ability to apply that knowledge in a fluid and uncertain world.” The College, grounded as it has been in the traditional liberal arts, is very much tilting the other way, expanding engineering and applied sciences, and inspiriting entrepreneurship. That prompts anxieties about waning student interest in humanities and adults’ responsibility to assure that their charges are broadly, not merely vocationally, educated.
 
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