topleft
topright

Want This Page Wider?

Use the A+, A-, R, and <> or <-> buttons at the top right of this page to make the fonts bigger and smaller or switch between a fixed-width and fluid-width style to this web site.

Syndicate

E-mail Bouncing?

In an effort to control spam, WP-ORG has implemented several blacklists that may be blocking your e-mail to a WP-ORG list or account.  Click here to fill out a trouble ticket.

How Can I Help WP-ORG?

  • Donate to one of WP-ORG's semi-annual fund drives. 
  • Buy anything at Amazon.com through our Gradstore affilate program.
  • Support our paid advertisers listed at our affiliates page.
  • Send a message to This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it to inquire about advertising rates on WP-ORG.
Advertisement
2 BCT commander heads to the Pentagon
For most of the past two years, Col. Joseph Ryan was on standby, waiting for the Army to send him and his 4,200 troops from the 2nd Brigade Combat Team across the globe to respond to crises or pitch in aid after a natural disaster.

As the unit on status as the Global Response Force, he knew he would have to recall and deploy his paratroopers in as little as 18 hours.

"The experience of being on the Global Response Force, it revalidates the notion that the paratrooper and 82nd Airborne Division can do anything," he said. "We give them training that challenges them and pushes them to prepare for deployment. We work very hard, train very hard, challenge ourselves on a daily basis."
 
Ryan will leave the 2nd Brigade Combat Team as he heads to Washington, D.C., to serve as the executive officer to the Army's chief of staff at the Pentagon. He'll be working directly with Gen. Mark Milley, the former commander of Forces Command who is currently the Army's chief of staff.

"It's a great opportunity," Ryan said. "It's a challenge, and I'm looking forward to it."

Ryan's path to the Pentagon began when he was accepted into the United States Military Academy. He grew up near West Point and knew he wanted to pursue a military career.

"My family had a lot of pride," he said. "Being in the Army and leading people was something I really enjoy."

Ryan graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1991 and was commissioned as a second lieutenant of infantry.
 
Speaking Frankly, at West Point
Drew Faust gave one of the signal speeches of her Harvard presidency at West Point this past March. The subject was education in the humanities—and in leadership. Her talk brought to the fore common Faust themes: immersion in the arts and humanities and learning to think critically about values. The venue and format (a formal address, rather than the occasions where an interlocutor poses questions, and Faust’s answers are briefer) made a difference.

At the United States Military Academy (USMA), as Faust noted, “the humanities are resources that build ‘self-awareness, character, [and] perspective,’ and enable leaders to compel and to connect with others.” She identified three ways in which that occurs. “First,” she said, “leaders need perspective”—the historical and cultural lenses that clarify a situation through “empathy: how to see ourselves inside another person’s experience. How to picture a different possibility.” Second, “leaders need the capacity to improvise. I often point out that education is not the same thing as training for a job.…Circumstances evolve. Certainly, soldiers know…that our knowledge needs to be flexible, as we grapple with complexity in an instant.” Third, she emphasized how leaders like Churchill and Lincoln “use the persuasive power of language.”

Two broad applications to Harvard come to mind. One concerns transitions. West Point, Faust noted, was “the nation’s first college of engineering.” Now, even as “other institutions drop liberal-arts requirements, military academies have been adding them. Over the past 50 years, West Point has transformed its curriculum into a general liberal-arts education, graduating leaders with broad-based knowledge of both the sciences and the humanities, and the ability to apply that knowledge in a fluid and uncertain world.” The College, grounded as it has been in the traditional liberal arts, is very much tilting the other way, expanding engineering and applied sciences, and inspiriting entrepreneurship. That prompts anxieties about waning student interest in humanities and adults’ responsibility to assure that their charges are broadly, not merely vocationally, educated.
 
Fallen West Point cadet honored
Hundreds of Family, friends, comrades and supporters attended a memorial held for Cadet Mitchell Alexander Winey, 21, at the Spirit of Fort Hood Chapel, June 9.

Winey, of the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, was one of nine victims when flood waters took his life, and the lives of eight Soldiers, while conducting convoy operations with 3rd Battalion, 16th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, June 2.

"We are here on a solemn day, to pay tribute to a fallen comrade," said Maj. Gen. J.T. Thomson III, 1st Cav. Div. commanding general. "Today's ceremony allows Mitch's fellow cadets to honor him.

"To Mitch's Family," he added, "thank you for being here, and more so, thank you for allowing Mitch to serve our nation."

Winey's memorial was held ahead of the other eight fallen at Fort Hood as post officials wanted Winey's brothers- and sisters-in-arms to be able to attend. The cadets returned to New York Saturday. The memorials for Fort Hood's eight Soldiers will be held today at the Spirit of Fort Hood Chapel.

More than 100 cadets from West Point have been at Fort Hood since late May for their Cadet Troop Leadership Training -- a course all West Point cadets go through during their time at the academy.
 
USMA Cadets Shooting Down Drones With Cyber Rifles
Tall grass hid the advancing cadets from my perch in building 7. The tall grass hid nothing from the drone the defenders flew over their position, a Parrot AR 2.0, a common model used by civilian fliers. A minute later, after the drone pilot filmed the crawling cadets, instructors called in mock artillery fire. The cadets' position was compromised, and while the rest of their platoon advanced to take the buildings, these 10 cadets instead spent an hour in the sun contemplating what they could have done about the drone.
 
The answer was standing right behind them. As the smoke grenades denoting artillery landed nearby, a supporting electronic warfare officer aimed a rifle-shaped antenna at the drone. The drone crashed to the ground instantly, its camera going fuzzy and then only showing the pilot a close-up of asphalt.
 
The rest of the battle was a success for all involved: the defending squad of cadets successfully retreated, that attacking platoon took and held the buildings, and the Army Cyber Institute gave the Army’s next generation of leaders a taste of the complexity that cheap commercial technology can bring to modern war.
I, a non-combatant, am here at this rural training site near the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York, on this June Thursday at the invitation of the Army Cyber Institute.
 
Part of the Army’s larger cyber complex, the Institute is a sort of internal think-tank at West Point, trying to figure out what the cyber component of warfare looks like in practice. “Cyber” is a broad term, and it mostly brings to mind people sitting at desks slinging code across the internet.
 
“Cyber electromagnetic activities,” says the definition in an Army field manual on the same, “are activities leveraged to seize, retain, and exploit an advantage over adversaries and enemies in both cyberspace and the electromagnetic spectrum, while simultaneously denying and degrading adversary and enemy use of the same and protecting the mission command system.”
 
From Wounded Warrior to Warrior Angel
When Andrew Marr left his home of Argyle, Texas, to compete at the 2016 Department of Defense Warrior Games, winning his respective events of discus and shotput was not the first thing on his mind.

"Winning is a byproduct," said Marr, a medically retired Special Forces combat engineer. "I always try to contribute and perform to the best of my abilities and by doing that, my hope is that it will inspire and encourage others to know that they can do the same."

Marr's journey toward becoming an inspiration to other wounded warriors began years ago when he suffered a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) after receiving enemy 107mm rocket fire during a combat mission in Wardak, Afghanistan.

"I came back to and we were in a fight, so there wasn't really any time to think about it or talk about it," said Marr. "And it was just part of the job, so I didn't think much about it after that.

In addition to the rocket attack, Marr was continuously exposed to blast waves while performing his functions as a combat engineer.

"I was a breacher for our team. So, that means I put surgical explosive charges on denied points of entry," said Marr. "Being that my specialty was explosives, I was around countless explosions -- hundreds, if not thousands. Back then, we never made any correlation between head trauma and blast waves. It just wasn't a thing, nobody knew anything about it."

Eventually, the symptoms of his injury -- memory loss, vision issues, migraines, lost vocabulary, and depression -- led him to seek treatment for his TBI. During his journey, Marr says he crossed paths with a neuro-endocrinologist who not only drastically helped improve his condition, but in doing so inspired him to try to help others with the same condition. 
 
Army officer killed in Orlando attack

The Army Reserve officer killed Sunday morning in the Orlando nightclub massacre had been in uniform for nearly eight years, deployed to Kuwait for 11 months during the drawdown from Operation Iraqi Freedom, and was remembered by his commanding officer as a leader who "truly cared about the Soldiers in his charge."

Capt. Antonio D. Brown, 30, was one of 49 victims in the deadliest shooting in U.S. history. Twenty-seven others who were injured when a gunman opened fire at Pulse nightclub remained hospitalized as of Tuesday afternoon, USA Today reported, including six in critical condition. The gunman reportedly died in a shootout with police.

Read more... 

 
 
 
Army's 241st birthday 2016
Happy birthday to the U.S. Army.

The Army's 241st birthday is June 14. The day will be marked with celebrations and traditional cake cutting ceremonies held around the country.

"The U.S. Army's 241st Birthday is...a day we celebrate the Total Army Force comprised of multi-component Soldiers and Department of the Army Civilians and their contributions to national defense. The American Soldier trains, deploys, engages, and destroys enemies of the United States in combat operations as the world's premier land force," Army officials said.

In additional to local events at military installations around the country, there will also be a wreath laying ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery on June 14; Twilight Tattoo and Capitol Hill Cake Cutting on June 15; Pentagon Cake Cutting on June 16; Army Staff Run on June 17; and the Army Birthday Ball on June 18.
 
Warrior Games at West Point
When the Warrior Games kick off Wednesday on the historic grounds of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y. some 250 injured and ill servicemembers and veterans will begin their gold medal quests in eight adaptive sports.

But for the people who have spent the last year preparing for the first Army-sponsored Warrior Games, the event is about much more than winning, said Col. Thomas Sutton, the planning and operations chief for Army Warrior Transition Command, which led the games’ preparations.

“It’s really about these athletes and their families who have overcome so much adversity,” Sutton said. “It’s about recognizing these men and women and continuing to build awareness and understanding – bringing into the spotlight their resiliency.”

The 2016 Warrior Games, the second games planned by the Defense Department and the sixth annual event, will run through June 21. The events include sitting volleyball, track and field, archery, cycling, wheelchair basketball, shooting and swimming.

Adaptive sports are a major part of the military’s programs to help injured troops rehabilitate as they transition back into service or into civilian life. Often athletics help the servicemembers gain confidence and, for many of them, provide an activity they can compete in the rest of their lives, Sutton said.

West Point was the obvious choice for the Army to host the games, he said.
 
Visiting West Point - "Real I.D." required
U.S. Citizens: All visitors age 16 and older signing up to take a bus tour of West Point MUST provide valid photo identification such as; a current valid driver's license or passport, or school ID (must be school-age). Each individual, age 16 and older, must present their own form of identification. No tour guide may bring in ID bundles for the group. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Effective Jan. 10, 2016, people using a driver's license from the states of Illinois, Minnesota, Missouri, New Mexico or Washington will have to use another form of identification in order to enter West Point and all other military installations. Enhanced driver's licenses from these states are acceptable. If you possess a valid Department of Defense issued identification card this new requirement does not affect your ability to enter military installations.

Acceptable alternate forms of identification are a U.S. passport, a permanent resident card/Alien Registration Receipt (form 1-551), a foreign passport with a temporary I-551 stamp or visa or an employment authorization document that contains a photograph (Form I-766).
 
Cadet training a long-standing tradition
Sending cadets to learn from military officers has deep-seated roots at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.
The academy has been sending cadets to train with active duty officers under the Cadet Troop Leader Training program since at least the 1920s, said West Point spokesman Lt. Col. Christopher Kasker.
 
In nearly 100 years of sending cadets to military installations, 21-year-old Cadet Mitchell Alexander Winey is the only cadet in the academy’s records to have died during the mandatory three-week course, he said.
 
Winey and eight active duty soldiers died when their vehicle overturned in flood waters June 2. Three soldiers were rescued and were able to return to work.
Putting cadets with a mentor began with installations along the East Coast and then grew to encompass installations across the continental United States and abroad during the 20th Century, Kasker said.
 
“Cadets attend Cadet Troop Leader Training once during either of the final two summers at the Military Academy, and it’s a graduation requirement for cadets,” he said. “Having the opportunity to work with soldiers, a platoon sergeant, company commander, first sergeant and other leaders in a company provides an experience that will shape and influence the rest of a cadet’s time at West Point. It provides cadets a foundation to inform their self-development and how they want to grow as a leader.”
 
Just about every Army post supports the cadet training, Kasker said. The Academy submits a request to the Department of the Army in October of each year requesting support, posts report the number of cadets they could support to the Army and then the Academy assigns the cadets to a military installation based on a number of factors — to include class rank, post preference, desired branch and summer schedule.
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Results 101 - 125 of 287

Recent Fallen Grads

Who's Online

We have 1 guest online

West-Point.Org (WP-ORG), a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization not affiliated officially with the United States Military Academy, provides an online communications infrastructure that enables graduates, parents, and friends of the military academy to maintain and strengthen the associations that bind us together. We will provide this community any requested support, consistent with this purpose, as quickly and efficiently as possible. WP-ORG is funded by the generosity of member contributions. Our communication services are provided in cooperation with the AOG (independent of USMA) and are operated by volunteers serving the Long Gray Line. Contents of and comments on this web site do not reflect the official position of the United States Military Academy or the Department of the Army.  For questions or comments, please email us at This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

DISCLAIMER:  This website is privately owned and operated.  The contents of this site, including words, images, and opinions, are unofficial and not to be considered as the official views of the the United States Military Academy, United States Army, or Department of Defense.  This site is not endorsed by the United States Military Academy, United States Army, or Department of Defense.  Users accept and agree to this disclaimer in the use of any information obtained from this website.
Joomla Template by Joomlashack
Joomla Templates by JoomlaShack Joomla Templates