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Carter Describes Security Networks’ Role in Confronting Threats PDF Print E-mail

Defense Secretary Ash Carter discussed the importance of establishing and maintaining security networks with partner nations to confront global threats during a speech to the Center for a New American Security here today.

Carter focused on the security networks the United States has forged in the Asia-Pacific region, the Middle East and in Europe.

Overall, such networks enable nations to act together to deter conflict, provide protection and meet transnational threats such as terrorism, the secretary said. “Now, security networking does differ across regions,” he added, “and that makes sense, because each has its own unique history, geography, politics and security needs.”

Networking for Security

The Asia-Pacific networks are based on weaving together bilateral, trilateral and multilateral relationships into a larger, regionwide network, Carter said, noting that there has never been a regionwide security arrangement there in the past.

“In the Middle East and North Africa, we’re leading coalitions and networks to address key security challenges like [the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant] and other terror groups, and to counter Iran’s malign influence,” the secretary said.

In Europe, the United States is working within the NATO alliance to bolster deterrence, handle unregulated migration and confront threats in new domains.

“In each region, the basic principle is the same,” Carter said. “We’re bringing together like-minded partners to enhance cooperation and build and strengthen connections,” he said. “And in each region, the network needs a networker -- a nation and a military to enable it.”

Connections:

Connections take many forms, the secretary said. “For one, we’re sharing information, including intelligence, in new ways, to allow our militaries to communicate better and in real time so that we can work together seamlessly and quickly,” he told the audience. “More and more, we’re leveraging persistent rotational forces that allow us to project presence without the requirements of permanent footprints.”

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Strikes Hit ISIL Terrorists in Syria, Iraq PDF Print E-mail

U.S. and coalition military forces continued to attack Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant terrorists in Syria and Iraq yesterday, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

Officials reported details of the latest strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.


Strikes in Syria


Attack, fighter, and remotely piloted aircraft conducted 12 strikes in Syria:


-- Near Manbij, 10 strikes struck six separate ISIL tactical units and destroyed five ISIL fighting positions.


-- Near Mara, two strikes struck two separate ISIL tactical units and destroyed an ISIL fighting position and an ISIL rocket-propelled grenade system.


Strikes in Iraq


Rocket artillery, and bomber, attack, fighter, and remotely piloted aircraft conducted 11 strikes in Iraq, coordinated with and in support of Iraq’s government:

-- Near Beiji, a strike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed two ISIL fighting positions, an ISIL vehicle, an ISIL mortar system, an ISIL tunnel entrance, an ISIL rocket cache and two ISIL rocket rails.

-- Near Fallujah, two strikes struck a large ISIL tactical unit and destroyed 17 ISIL fighting positions, an ISIL vehicle, five ISIL heavy machine guns, eight ISIL light machine guns and an ISIL rocket propelled grenade system and denied ISIL access to terrain.

-- Near Mosul, three strikes struck a large ISIL tactical unit and an ISIL weapons and foreign fighter support facility and destroyed an ISIL tunnel, two ISIL assembly areas and an ISIL command and control node and suppressed an ISIL rocket firing position.

-- Near Ramadi, three strikes struck two separate ISIL tactical units and destroyed an ISIL fighting position, an ISIL vehicle, an ISIL boat, an ISIL bed-down location and an ISIL weapons cache, and an ISIL staging area.

-- Near Rawah, two strikes struck an ISIL vehicle bomb-making factory and an ISIL improvised weapons factory.

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Reserve Soldiers Combine Civilian, Army Skills PDF Print E-mail
The U.S. Army Reserve transportation management coordinators, of the 385th Transportation Detachment, Fort Bragg, North Carolina traveled across the country to participate in Combat Support Training Exercise 91-16-02 at Fort Hunter Liggett, California. These Soldiers walk, talk, and perform at the same level as their active duty counterparts, with one exception: They also have full-time civilian careers.

As the largest U.S. Army Reserve training exercise, CSTX 91-16-02 provides Soldiers with unique opportunities to sharpen their technical and tactical skills in combat-like conditions. Soldiers from the 385th put their civilian lives on hold for this three-week exercise to report for military duty and provide transportation movement control to units at Tactical Assembly Area Schoonover.

“The Soldiers stop the vehicles, ask for trip tickets and log the time,” said Staff Sgt. Araina McCormick, from Fayetteville, N.C.

A seemingly simple task, this job keeps track of the times Soldiers depart and return from missions. Whether in a training scenario or a combat zone, this is a critical point in the movement control process, providing information about which personnel or vehicles may be missing, and for how long.

The duty these Soldiers perform is essential for the safety and success of CSTX, and positively affects each Soldier's personal and professional development when they bring what the U.S. Army Reserve has taught them back into their civilian lives.

For Spc. Jahvar Billings, from Pembroke, North Carolina, that means utilizing the discipline and time management skills the Army has given him into his life as a full-time student.
 
Warrior Games final: Top team goes to black & gold PDF Print E-mail
Heat, humidity and wicked thunderstorms forced organizers of the 2015 Warrior Games to juggle schedules and work overtime to ensure the safety of all athletes, but little could dampen the spirit of sports as 270 athletes competed for 527 medals in Quantico, Virginia, June 19-28.

The Army team smoked the competition, earning the grand prize of the games, the Chairman's Cup, by bringing home 162 medals, including 69 golds. Taking second place for the second year in a row, the Marine Corps team earned 105 medals, including 47 golds.
 
 Air Force came in third in the medal count with 87, followed at their heels by the British team, with 85. Special Operations Command athletes earned 45 medals, while the combined Navy and Coast Guard team took home 43.

With his service hosting this year's games, Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Joe Dunford praised the athletes for their indomitable spirit — for adapting and for overcoming the challenges they have faced during illness, injury and recovery.
 
DoD Hack the Pentagon' Program Nets 138 Issues PDF Print E-mail
Hack the planet? Tough. Hack the Pentagon? Easier, but still fairly tough. Yet, that didn't stop more than 250 hackers from taking part in the Department of Defense's first-ever bug bounty program. The pilot, which ran from April 18 to May 12—less than a month—netted 138 vulnerabilities that the Defense Department determined to be "legitimate, unique and eligible for a bounty."

Though the bug bounty program ended up costing the federal government around $150,000, officials believe it was money well spent.

"It's not a small sum, but if we had gone through the normal process of hiring an outside firm to do a security audit and vulnerability assessment, which is what we usually do, it would have cost us more than $1 million," said Ash Carter, Secretary of Defense, as reported by the DoD.

The Department of Defense seems pleased by the results, as it also announced that it's now planning to expand its bug bounty program and introduce other policies designed to help bolster DoD security. That includes the creation of a new vulnerability disclosure policy that will allow anyone to submit information about potential vulnerabilities in DoD systems, networks, applications, or websites.

"Next we will expand bug bounty programs to other DoD Components, in particular the Services, by developing a sustainable DoD-wide contract vehicle. Lastly, we'll include incentives in our acquisition policies and guidance so that contractors practice greater transparency and open their own systems for testing – especially DoD source code. With these efforts, we will capitalize on Hack the Pentagon's success and continue to evolve the way we secure DoD networks, systems, and information," reads an announcement from the Department of Defense.
 
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