Shelly Freed

[11 NOV 1930 - A2 - 20611]



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Camp and Freed under A-2 Flag
[50th Reunion]



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Joe Vincent - Mike Stevenson - Ray Dax - Luke Lucas - Al Spaulding - Tom Auger Tommy West - Pete Fikaris - Dick Prater - Bob Camp - Shelly Freed [50th Reunion]



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[10th Reunion - 1965]

Standing [L to R]: Weaver - Lewis - Turner - Chikalla - Gallup - O'Brien - Freed - Hadly - Wix - ? - Streett - ? - Reb Young - Quinn - Lenio - ? - Perkins - Thorsen - ? - Nieves - Sherman - Burroughs - Giza - Traut - Sloan - Gay - Paul Parks - Andrews - Ginter - Bates - McNair - ? - Lichtenberg - Nidever - Secord - Feagin - Cathey - Herren - ? - ? - Ludwig - ? - ? - ? - Ralls - ? - Shimunek - Macdonald - ? - ? - ? - ? - ? - Bob Strickland - Front [L to R]: Soper - Newton - Dax - Chance - Schmidt - Shideler - Bergen - Matteson - Hargrove - Hornbarger - Steakley - Stevens - Drummond - Rudzki - Knierem - Wargowsky - ? - Stern - ? - ? - Livesay - Dickson - Michalove - Hagan - Landers - ? - Blitch - ? - Cardillo - Ordway - Trobaugh - Crancer - Maus - LaFrenz - Sydenham - Strom - ? - Howie Stone - Schepps - Raymond - Spellman - Sanderson ? - Wray - Fikaris - Stevenson - Sims - ?

Larger Size



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A-2 Firsties - 1st Row: Vincent - Joseph - Stevenson - Fikaris - Prater - Stemle - 2nd Row: Freed - Adams - West - Jim Miller - Mason - Jellison - 3rd Row: Auger (CO) - Spaulding - Reid - Lucas - Rupp - Weissenborn - 4th Row: Dax - Senger - Camp - Schauer



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Left: West - Funkhouser - Lucas - Freed - Peterson x55 - Cardillo - Right: Klett x55 - Wargowsky - Weissenborn - Peterson - Lauer x55 - Skaff [The Iron Squad - AUG 1951]



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2012 AOG Online Register Entry

Register Glossary



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Ode to My Combat Boots

Majestic mold, from putrefying waste
Redeemed by the tanner's art
Your host, gone to sate some human taste
While you're recast to play a grander part

How noble stand you now beside my bed
The shaped servant of my striding limbs
Firmed by laces raw that stretch up from your head
That give you strength to serve my many whims

Today your body gleams in polished might
Your soft full lines disguise a courage rare
You follow through the day or through the night
In silent service, you are always there

You are the victim of my will
Reborn to die a thousand times
Tortured, torn, but rising still
As I do rise neath victory's chimes

Yes, you are there in victory or defeat
You test the earth of beggars and of kings
You guard me from the dangers of the street
And carry me aloft on leather wings

A servant, slave, lackey you may be
Drowned, or dried, driven by my call
But fate preserves the basest pain for me
In life so lifted, in death so far to fall.

To our classmates and those who have gone
before us... who walked the walk

Jonathan Freed 1955
Ranger School 1956


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Panama

Bob Camp wrote:

Shelly,

Did you take Spanish at West Point?

Bob

PS: Was your first assignment Panama?

_________________________________


I took French and it almost turned both Tom West and me out. I was assigned to Puerto Rico but at the last minute they said they were shutting that base down (Fort Buchanan) and were changing my orders to Panama. Our TAC, Captain Patton said, Freed, Hear you're going to Panama. They'll probably have a Revolution! I sort of did. Miguel Nieves offered to drive me downtown to see the City the day of my arrival, and I saw this attractive girl crossing the street. I said, Miguel, park here, I'm going to marry that girl. Four years later I did.

My Spanish lessons really began when we went into the Jungle for Jungle Warfare Training (I had just completed Ranger and Airborne training). I started reading the Army Manual of Spanish-English phrases. The first thing I learned was - Mas vale un pajaro en mano que cien volando - that was all the Spanish I knew: A bird in the hand is worth a hundred flying. I can't tell you how many times I used that thought later at the negotiating table when I was forced to settle for less than I had hope for.

In my first experience with Spanish I decided that Spanish was quite easy - all you had to do was add an A to the end of the English word. I was in the movie with my date before the film started and I wanted to apologize for something so I said: Espero que yo no a hecho usted embarrasada - using my A strategy of adding a to embarrased. The whole movie exploded in laughter. She soon made it clear to me that what I really said was - I hope I didn't make you pregnant. That was the end of that theory - although it does work quite often. It is how you say or pronounce it that matters.

Having now been in and out of Panama for over 60 years I can manage to carry on a decent conversation without getting into any trouble and better yet staying out of trouble. My Three daughters were born in Panama, and my oldest speaks seven languages. None of them live here. My youngest had the ability to go to any country and in a month speak the language. Among her languages she was fluent in Hebrew and Arabic and travelled to Syria. Unfortunately she passed away 13 years ago - cancer. The world lost a shining star.

I didn't forget your question that I sort of elaborated on - Did you take Spanish at West Point? Again, the answer is NO. But when you ask an octogenarian a question don't expect to get a one word answer except if hes Fikaris.

Fondest personal regards,

Shelly

P.S. - It does help to have a Spanish speaking girlfriend.


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